Comments to FEC Regarding Notice 2016-10: Rulemaking Petition: Implementing the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015

VIA ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION SYSTEM Federal Election Commission Attn.: Mr. Neven F. Stipanovic Acting Assistant General Counsel Federal Election Commission 999 E Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20463 RE: Notice 2016-10: Rulemaking Petition: Implementing the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 Dear Mr. Stipanovic: The Center for Competitive Politics (“the Center”)[1] respectfully submits these comments in […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Comments, Contribution Limits Federal, External Relations Comments and Testimony, Federal, Federal Comments and Testimony, FEC, federal election commission, Owen Yeates, Political Parties

Campaign Finance Regulations Increase the Influence of Super PACs

Bloomberg BNA recently covered a report highlighting a developing trend in campaign finance this election cycle. The report, by the Campaign Finance Institute (CFI), shows a clear decrease in political fundraising for presidential candidates and parties in 2016, coupled with an increase in super PAC spending, compared with 2012. Total fundraising in support of Hillary […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Super PACs, 2016 Presidential Fundraising, Campaign Finance Institute, DNC, Political Parties, RNC

Petition for Rulemaking to Strengthen Political Parties

A new FEC rulemaking petition from Sandler Reiff looks to strengthen political parties. State and local party committees play a critical role in the American political system. First, they play an important role in our democracy by pursuing political goals that a majority of Americans support. Second these committees are well situated to perform grassroots […]

Filed Under: Blog, FEC, Political Parties

Are state parties a solution to political “chaos”?

“It’s chaos out there.” That’s how Jonathan Rauch, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, describes the state of politics today. Rauch and Raymond J. La Raja, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a CCP Academic Advisor, believe that freeing state parties to play a more active […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Money in Politics, Super PACs, Brookings Institution, Jason Perkey, John Phillippe, Jonathan Rauch, Political Parties, Raymond J. La Raja

Larry Lessig and the Barriers to Political Campaigning

“We’ve now created the green primary, where only the funders get to vote and they vote on who will have the money necessary to run their campaigns.” That’s how Harvard Professor-turned-political activist Larry Lessig describes politics today, drawing explicit comparisons to “white primaries” in the Jim Crow south that systematically disenfranchised African-American voters. Lessig formed […]

Filed Under: Blog, DNC, Larry Lessig, Media, Political Parties, super PACs

Legislative Review: 2013 State Legislative Trends – Campaign Contribution Limits Increase in Nine States

As this Legislative Review explains, a Center for Competitive Politics’ survey of 2013 state legislative activity shows that nine states – Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Wyoming – raised or eliminated various campaign contribution limits last year. Five states increased their limits by 100% or more, two more increased their […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, 50 State Survey, Alabama, Arizona, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Connecticut, Corporate to Candidate Contributions, First Amendment, Florida, Illinois, Incumbency Protection, Independent Expenditures, independent spending, Individual to Candidate Contributions, Luke Wachob, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, PACs, Political Parties, State Legislative Activity, super PACs, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming, Contribution Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

Richer Parties, Better Politics? Party-Centered Campaign Finance Laws and American Democracy

Campaign finance laws effect how money is channeled through organizations to influence elections. In contrast to most other democracies, American campaign finance laws have been designed to be “candidate-centered” with relatively weak political parties. Additionally, recent trends have seen independent forms of speech such as political action committees (PACs) and Super PACs become much more […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, campaign contributions, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, money in politics, Political Parties, Raymond La Raja, super PACs, Contribution Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties

Why the Center Does Not Hold: The Causes of Hyperpolarized Democracy in America

In this New York University School of Law working paper by Professor Richard H. Pildes, examines the increase in partisan polarization and its effect on political parties. According to the author, we have not seen the intensity of political conflict and the radical separation between the two major political parties that characterizes our age since […]

Filed Under: Political Parties, Research, Barack Obama, campaign finance, George W. Bush, New York University School of Law, Polarization, Political Parties, Richard Pildes, Voting Rights Act of 1965, Political Parties

Direct Democracy Works

Until recently, direct democracy scholarship was primarily descriptive or normative. Much of it sought to highlight the processes’ shortcomings. In this paper, John G. Matsusaka describes new research that examines direct democracy from a more scientific perspective. We organize the discussion around four “old” questions that have long been at the heart of the direct […]

Filed Under: Expenditure, First Amendment, Issue Advocacy, Political Committees & 527s, Research, committees, democracy, expenditure, John Matsusaka, money, Political Parties, super PACs, voter, Expenditure, Issue Advocacy, Petition Rights, Political Committees & 527s, Expenditure, Issue Advocacy, Petition Rights, Political Committees & 527s

It’s the Spending, Stupid: Understanding Campaign Finance in the Big-Government Era

In this briefing paper, Patrick Basham confronts the concern that the United States spends too much money on campaigns and elections. That proposition is difficult to sustain since the nation spends so little of its wealth on campaigns. In addition to accounting for inflation, any increase in election spending should also be seen in the […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, FEC, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, expenditure, FEC, government, Patrick Basham, Political Committees, Political Parties, spending, super PACs, Contribution Limits, Expenditure, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Expenditure, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties