Senator Klobuchar on Campaign Finance: An Admission Against Interest?

As most any law student can tell you, “strict scrutiny” is the toughest standard of judicial review in federal court. Normally, it applies whenever the government seeks to place limits on the exercise of a “fundamental right.” To survive “strict scrutiny,” a law must address a “compelling” government interest, and be “narrowly tailored” to address […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Amy Klobuchar, Federal Election Campaign Act, First Amendment, Gorsuch, Hobby Lobby, Neil Gorsuch, Riddle v. Hickenlooper, strict scrutiny, Supreme Court, Colorado

Speech These Days: It’s Just Too Damn Loud…

Howard Schweber, a Professor of Political Science and Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, flippantly claims that the most imminent threat to our democracy is speech that is, in his opinion, too “loud.” According to a recent blog by Schweber in The Huffington Post, some speakers in our democracy, like some commenters on the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, Buckley v. Valeo, First Amendment, Howard Schweber, Internet Speech

We give Fact Checker one-half Pinocchio: Super PACs and our complex campaign finance system

Back when I was serving as Chairman of the Federal Election Commission, I met with a delegation of officials from China. Since they spoke little English, we conversed through an interpreter. They were full of questions about campaign finance in the U.S., and soon I was trying to explain our incredibly regulated, complex system. There […]

Filed Under: Amending the Constitution, Blog, Communications, Contribution Limits, Media Resources, Media Watch, Super PACs, Bernie Sanders, Charles Idelson, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Fact Checker, First Amendment, Michelle Ye Hee Lee, National Nurses United for Patient Protection, super PACs, The Washington Post Fact Checker

Issue Analysis No. 9: Aggregate and Proportional Limits in the States: Have they Reduced Corruption or Promoted Better Government?

The Center’s ninth Issue Analysis examines the potential impact of the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision on the states with existing aggregate limit provisions, particularly as it relates to the effect of those provisions on both public corruption rates and how well a state is governed. For background, on April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, State, aggregate limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Contribution limits, First Amendment, Good Governance, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, money in politics, Pew Center on the States, Public Corruption, Shaun McCutcheon, Supreme Court, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon Likely Unconstitutional or Highly Vulnerable By Matt Nese Please note:  This report has been updated to reflect state responses to the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision. On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued its decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which invalidated the federal aggregate limit […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Parties, Research, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Base Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, District of Columbia, First Amendment, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, Quid Pro Quo, Shaun McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Legislative Review: 2013 State Legislative Trends – Campaign Contribution Limits Increase in Nine States

As this Legislative Review explains, a Center for Competitive Politics’ survey of 2013 state legislative activity shows that nine states – Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Wyoming – raised or eliminated various campaign contribution limits last year. Five states increased their limits by 100% or more, two more increased their […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, 50 State Survey, Alabama, Arizona, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Connecticut, Corporate to Candidate Contributions, First Amendment, Florida, Illinois, Incumbency Protection, Independent Expenditures, independent spending, Individual to Candidate Contributions, Luke Wachob, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, PACs, Political Parties, State Legislative Activity, super PACs, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming, Contribution Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

The Last Rites of Public Campaign Financing?

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision in Arizona Free Enterprise v. Bennett, this Nebraska Law Review article by Hofstra University Law School Professor James J. Sample asserts the current predicament of public campaign financing is such that options that are still on the table under the Court’s First Amendment jurisprudence are, with […]

Filed Under: External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Arizona Free Enterprise v. Bennett, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, clean elections, First Amendment, James J. Sample, NYC, public financing, Supreme Court, tax financing, taxpayer financed campaigns, taxpayer-financed campaigns, First Amendment, First Amendment, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Connecticut, Maine

The Curious Case of Contribution Limits in an Era of Independent Expenditures

Minnesota was one of eight states to raise contribution limits in 2013, but according to some, the Gopher State hasn’t gone far enough to resolve concerns surrounding its campaign finance system. The AP reports: Minnesota campaign finance regulators are wrestling with how to maintain proper separation between candidates and political groups independently spending money on […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, campaign contributions, campaign finance, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Contribution limits, coordination, First Amendment, independent speech, independent spending, Luke Wachob, Minnesota, Minnesota Campaign Finance Board, money in politics, super PACs, Minnesota

In Defense of “Super PAC’s” and of the First Amendment

In this article, CCP Academic Advisor and Brooklyn Law School Professor Joel Gora offers a defense of “Super PACs” and of the First Amendment principles that they embody; namely, that in order to make our democracy work, we need a robust, wide-open and uninhibited discussion of politics and government. Although Super PACs have gotten bad […]

Filed Under: First Amendment, Independent Speech, Research, Super PACs, Academic Advisory Board, ACLU, Brooklyn Law School, Buckley v. Valeo, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, First Amendment, free speech, independent expenditure, independent speech, independent spending, Joel Gora, money in politics, SpeechNow.org v. FEC, super PACs, First Amendment, Independent Speech, First Amendment, Independent Speech

Blatant Partisanship and Outright Misinformation: Public Citizen’s Press Conference

Yesterday’s Public Citizen event calling for the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to promulgate a rule forcing corporations to disclose their political spending was a disappointing mixture of blatant partisanship and outright misinformation. Headlined by Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) – for the first twenty minutes or so – Public Citizen’s panel […]

Filed Under: Blog, Communications, Corporate Governance Press Release/In the News/Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, corporate contributions, corporate disclosure, corporate governance, corporate speech, First Amendment, IRS and the Tea Party, money in politics, proxy, public citizen