Georgia

Mainstream Media Baffled by National Interest in Georgia Special Election

Following the Senate’s confirmation of former Representative Tom Price as the Secretary of Health and Human Services in early February 2017, all eyes have been on Georgia’s 6th congressional district. After Democrat Jon Ossoff narrowly failed to meet the 50%-plus-one vote threshold, which would have given him the seat outright, a runoff with Republican nominee […]

Filed Under: Blog, Issues, Media Watch, Money in Politics, Georgia Sixth Congressional District, Jon Ossoff, Karen Handel, Media, Out-of-State Donors, Political Spending, Georgia

Ossoff Outspends Opponent’s Campaign 5-1 but Complains About “Money in Politics”

More evidence money doesn’t buy elections Alexandria, VA – Center for Competitive Politics (CCP) President David Keating today criticized comments made by losing congressional candidate Jon Ossoff complaining about the role of money in politics in his race. Ossoff told NPR that “The role of money in politics is a major problem …. There have been super PACs in […]

Filed Under: Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Newsroom, Press Releases, Super PACs, Georgia Sixth Congressional District, Jon Ossoff, Karen Handel, Georgia

No, Taxpayer Financing of Campaigns Won’t Stop Out-of-State Political Spending

The special election for the U.S. House seat for Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District is attracting a great deal of attention from the media. The fact that the race features a relatively large amount of political spending coming from outside the state has been a particularly salient flash point in news articles. Over the weekend, Public […]

Filed Under: Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax-Financing, Jon Ossoff, Out-of-State Spending, PolitiFact, public citizen, public financing, Georgia

Out-of-State Spending Was High in Georgia Special Election, and That’s OK

The outsized attention being paid to a few special elections means an early opportunity for the politically active to create favorable momentum going into the 2018 midterms. Consequently, it also means the return of the perennially favorite election narrative: “shady, out-of-state money is drowning out local voters!” That’s the overarching message of an article from […]

Filed Under: Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Jon Ossoff, Out-of-State Spending, Sixth Congressional District, Georgia

Georgia H.B. 370; Analysis of Proposed Amendment to Regulate So-Called “Election Targeted Issue Advocacy”

The Honorable David Ralston The Honorable David Shafer Re:  H.B. 370; Analysis of Proposed Amendment to Regulate So-Called “Election Targeted Issue Advocacy” Dear Speaker Ralston and President Pro Tempore Shafer: The Center for Competitive Politics (CCP)[1] respectfully submits the following comments analyzing a proposed amendment to regulate “election targeted issue advocacy,” which we understand some […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, State Comments and Testimony, Election Targeted Issue Advocacy, Eric Wang, Georgia

Why Outside Spending Is Overrated: Lessons from the 2014 Senate Elections

In this article, Emory University professor Alan Abramowitz analyzes the impact of independent spending in the 2014 U.S. Senate elections. Republicans made major gains in the 2014 Senate elections, but the findings reported in Abramowitz’s article indicate that independent spending by conservative groups had little or nothing to do with those gains. The main reason […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Expenditure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Independent Speech, Issues, Money in Politics, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Expenditure, Independent Speech, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Carolina

Citizens United, States Divided: An Empirical Analysis of Independent Political Spending

This study examines the effect the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. FEC has on independent spending in American politics. Previous attempts to answer this question have focused solely on federal elections where there is no baseline for comparing changes in spending behavior. The authors, Douglas M. Spencer and Abby K. Wood, overcome […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Independent Speech, Issues, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Super PACs, 50 States, Abby K. Wood, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Corporate spending, Douglas M. Spencer, Independent Expenditures, Indepent Spending, Indiana Law Journal, money in politics, Supreme Court, Union spending, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Policy Primer: The National Popular Vote Proposal – A Step Away from Federalism and a Step Towards Chaos

This Policy Primer briefly reviews and summarizes five key shortcomings of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPV) and debunks the four most common myths associated with this plan for electing the President, which is quietly being signed onto in state legislatures across the country. The NPV proposal is an attempt to get states to agree […]

Filed Under: Electoral College, Research, Center for Competitive Politics, Checks and Balances, Electoral College, Founding Fathers, National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, npv, Policy Primer, Tara Ross, Electoral College, Electoral College, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Election Law Handbook for Legislators and State Policymakers

This Election Law Handbook provides an informative guide to a variety of topics in campaign finance and election law likely to arise in any state legislative session. A useful tool for anyone interested in topical election law issues, in addition to original content, this Handbook suggests recommended reading for more in-depth analysis of the subjects discussed […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, Electoral College, External Relations Sub-Pages, State, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Issue Analysis No. 7: Do Limits on Corporate and Union Giving to Candidates Lead to “Good” Government?

Since the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citi­zens United v. FEC, which freed corporations and labor unions to finance independent expen­ditures in support of federal candidates, the is­sue of corporate and union spending in elections has become a frequent and impassioned topic of political discussion. Most states treat limits on corporate and union giving to […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Big Labor, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Corporate Donations, Corporate Political Spending, corporations, Good Government, Grading the States, Labor Unions, Matt Nese, Pew Center on the States, Union Campaign Donations, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming