Political Parties

Outsourcing Politics: The Hostile Takeovers of Our Hollowed out Political Parties

In this article by New York University School of Law Professor Samuel Issacharoff, the author examines the effect of multiple factors, including strict campaign finance regulations, on the health of our nation’s political parties. As Issacharoff explains, in 2016, both the Republicans and Democrats experienced efforts at hostile takeover of their presidential campaigns. On the […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Research, Democratic Party, Republican Party, Ronald Coase, Samuel Issacharoff, V.O. Key, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties

The State of State Parties – and How Strengthening them Can Improve our Politics

In this Brookings Institution report by Raymond J. La Raja and Jonathan Rauch, the authors examine the campaign finance rules and regulations ensnaring state parties and assess how they are increasingly costly in an age when burgeoning independent groups face no such restrictions. According to the authors, historically, and still today, state parties act as […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Political Parties, Research, Contribution Limits, Coordination, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Political Parties

Increased Campaign Contribution Limits in the FY2015 Omnibus Appropriations Law: Frequently Asked Questions

This Congressional Research Service report, authored by R. Sam Garrett, provides brief answers to frequently asked questions about increased contribution limits on giving to national political party committees enacted and signed into law in December 2014 via the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015. The relevant language changes the amounts the two major […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contributions & Limits, Political Parties, FY 2015 CROmnibus, Research, Contributions & Limits, Political Parties

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon

State Aggregate Limits and Proportional Bans under McCutcheon Likely Unconstitutional or Highly Vulnerable By Matt Nese Please note:  This report has been updated to reflect state responses to the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision. On April 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued its decision in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which invalidated the federal aggregate limit […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Parties, Research, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Base Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, District of Columbia, First Amendment, Matt Nese, McCutcheon v FEC, Quid Pro Quo, Shaun McCutcheon, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Parties, Alaska, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Legislative Review: 2013 State Legislative Trends – Campaign Contribution Limits Increase in Nine States

As this Legislative Review explains, a Center for Competitive Politics’ survey of 2013 state legislative activity shows that nine states – Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Wyoming – raised or eliminated various campaign contribution limits last year. Five states increased their limits by 100% or more, two more increased their […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, 50 State Survey, Alabama, Arizona, Campaign Contribution Limits, Center for Competitive Politics, Connecticut, Corporate to Candidate Contributions, First Amendment, Florida, Illinois, Incumbency Protection, Independent Expenditures, independent spending, Individual to Candidate Contributions, Luke Wachob, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, PACs, Political Parties, State Legislative Activity, super PACs, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming, Contribution Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Alabama, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Vermont, Wyoming

Richer Parties, Better Politics? Party-Centered Campaign Finance Laws and American Democracy

Campaign finance laws effect how money is channeled through organizations to influence elections. In contrast to most other democracies, American campaign finance laws have been designed to be “candidate-centered” with relatively weak political parties. Additionally, recent trends have seen independent forms of speech such as political action committees (PACs) and Super PACs become much more […]

Filed Under: Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties, Research, campaign contributions, campaign finance, campaign finance reform, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, money in politics, Political Parties, Raymond La Raja, super PACs, Contribution Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Independent Speech, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties

Why the Center Does Not Hold: The Causes of Hyperpolarized Democracy in America

In this New York University School of Law working paper by Professor Richard H. Pildes, examines the increase in partisan polarization and its effect on political parties. According to the author, we have not seen the intensity of political conflict and the radical separation between the two major political parties that characterizes our age since […]

Filed Under: Political Parties, Research, Barack Obama, campaign finance, George W. Bush, New York University School of Law, Polarization, Political Parties, Richard Pildes, Voting Rights Act of 1965, Political Parties

Better Parties, Better Government: A Realistic Program for Campaign Finance Reform

In Better Parties, Better Government: A Realistic Program for Campaign Finance Reform (Washington, D.C.:  American Enterprise Institute Press, 2009), authors Joel M. Gora and Peter J. Wallison conduct a significant survey of campaign finance regulations beginning in the early 1970’s.

The authors assert that most of the provisions enacted over the past several decades have failed to achieve their goal of limiting corruption and instead have acted to strengthen the incumbency advantage. According to Gora and Wallison, “the current campaign finance system works to assist the campaigns of those who created it.”

After their exhaustive look at the history of campaign finance reform measures, Gora and Wallison examine past and current alternatives to remedy the broken system. They conclude that most reform schemes further the incumbency advantage, with taxpayer financed campaigns and contribution limits being the biggest offenders in this regard.

To remedy this issue, the authors demonstrate that the best and most effective way to fix the current incumbent-advantaged system would be to ease the coordination restrictions on parties, allowing them to become the principle campaign financier. Ultimately, the authors argue that this single change in the current system would have substantial benefits for the American election model.

Filed Under: Coordination, Political Parties, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, campaign contributions, Contribution, Contribution Limits, Coordination, Political Committees & 527s, Contributions & Limits, Coordination, Political Committees & 527s, Political Parties

Comments of CCP Vice President Steve Hoersting on Hybrid Communications

Written comments  of CCP Vice President Steve Hoersting on a June 8, 2007 message to the Federal Election Commission on the topic of hybrid communications.

Filed Under: Blog, External Relations Comments and Testimony, External Relations Sub-Pages, Federal, Federal Comments and Testimony, Uncategorized, campaign contributions, Contribution, Political Parties, Comments and Testimony

Policy Primer: A Constitutional Solution to the Problems of Control and Accountability in Party Independent Expenditures

Control and accountability in party independent expenditures can be restored constitutionally.  As this Policy Primer indicates, one way is to eliminate the dollar limit on candidate-coordinated advertising by party committees.

Filed Under: Uncategorized, Independent Speech, Independent Speech, Political Parties