Disclosure

Election Law Handbook for Legislators and State Policymakers

This Election Law Handbook provides an informative guide to a variety of topics in campaign finance and election law likely to arise in any state legislative session. A useful tool for anyone interested in topical election law issues, in addition to original content, this Handbook suggests recommended reading for more in-depth analysis of the subjects discussed […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Handouts, Contribution Limits State, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, Electoral College, External Relations Sub-Pages, State, Tax Financed Campaigns Handouts, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Electoral College, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Policy Primer: Campaign Finance Disclosure – The Devil is in the Details

As this Policy Primer on campaign finance disclosure explains, although advocates for greater regulation of political speech claim that there are large amounts of undisclosed money in politics, in fact, all spending that calls for the election or defeat of candidates is already disclosed, as is all spending and all but the smallest donations to […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Federal, Disclosure Handouts, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, Buckley v. Valeo, campaign finance disclosure, campaign finance reform, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Dark Money, Disclosure, Good Government, Major Purpose Test, money in politics, Reformers, transparency, Disclosure, Disclosure

Political Participation and Civic Courage: The Negative Effect of Transparency on Making Small Campaign Contributions

This study by Raymond J. La Raja examines whether public disclosure of campaign contributions affects individuals’ willingness to donate to candidates. Across the country, state campaign finance laws require disclosure of contributors’ private information at relatively low thresholds, ranging from $1 in seven states to $300 in New Jersey. Drawing on social influence theory, La […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, 50 States, Amherst, campaign contributions, Civic Participation, Disclosure, Political Giving, Raymond J. La Raja, Small Donors, Social Influence Theory, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Disclosure, Disclosure, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, District Of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

Information at the Margin: Campaign Finance Disclosure Laws, Ballot Issues, and Voter Knowledge

Some scholars have argued that information about the financial involvement of interest groups in ballot issue campaigns provides voters with valuable cues about how to vote on potentially complex and confusing issues. In this study, CCP Academic Advisor David Primo argues that the proper way to assess the informational benefits of disclosure is to assess whether […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Research, Disclosure, Disclosure

Disclosure in a Post-Citizens United Real World

In this article, CCP Chairman Bradley A. Smith examines several practical and constitutional issues with campaign finance disclosure. In particular, Smith scrutinizes those policies being advocated by proponents of greater regulation of political speech in response to the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. A primary political reaction to Citizens United […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Stand By Your Ad, Bradley A. Smith, Buckley v. Valeo, campaign finance disclosure, campaign finance reform, Capital University Law School, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. FEC, Dark Money, FECA, First Amendment, independent speech, money in politics, NAACP v. Alabama, West Virginia University, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Stand By Your Ad

Donor Disclosure: Undermining the First Amendment

In this essay, Cleta Mitchell, partner in the Washington, D.C. office of Foley & Lardner LLP and a member of the firm’s Political Law Practice, examines campaign finance disclosure both as a policy and as a response to the Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. FEC, which freed corporations, labor unions, and trade […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, campaign finance disclosure, campaign finance reform, Center for Competitive Politics, Citizens United v. FEC, Cleta Mitchell, Donor Disclosure, Foly & Lardner, money in politics, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Minnesota

Do State Campaign Finance Reforms Increase Trust and Confidence in State Government?

In this paper, CCP Academic Advisor Jeff Milyo tests the hypothesis that restrictive campaign finance laws improve citizens’ perceptions of government. The political and legal battle over campaign finance reform hinges on differing views about the importance of such regulations for preserving and enhancing the integrity of democracy. Milyo uses a novel data-set on individual-level […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Enforcement, External Relations Sub-Pages, Faulty Assumptions, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, campaign finance reform, clean elections, Contribution limits, Contribution Limits, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Do Voters Understand Super PACs?

Two years and two election cycles into the Super PAC era, the media firestorm against free speech and association has been palpable. A Google search of the term “Super PAC” reveals dozens of articles warning about the evils of such entities and their supposed negative impact on democracy. In this Issue Review, Jason M. Farrell […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, SpeechNow.org v. FEC, The New York Times, USA Today, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Disclosure, Independent Speech, Poll

Public Perception and the “Appearance of Corruption” in Campaign Finance

The Center for Competitive Politics in cooperation with University of Missouri Professor Jeff Milyo included several questions in the 2010 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, a national representative survey of 55,400 individuals.  The CCES data includes a set of common content questions given to all participants and separate team content questions developed by the University of Missouri and administered to a nationally representative subset of 1,000 persons.  A battery of eight campaign-finance-related questions was included in the Missouri team content; these are listed in full in the appendix.

We examine this data to learn what the average American thought about taxpayer-funded elections, contribution limits, the appearance of corruption, and disclosure. Since not just corruption, but the “appearance of corruption,” i.e. the public’s perception of the severity of corrupt practices in government bodies, has been given weight by the Supreme Court, we felt it was crucial to look at reliable data of a cross section of Americans and try to gain insight into their views, as well as to see how different wordings can skew the results in surveys on these topics.

 

 

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, Disclosure, Disclosure, Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Disclosure, Faulty Assumptions, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Full Disclosure: How Campaign Finance Disclosure Laws Fail to Inform Voters and Stifle Public Debate

Disclosure is intended to be a low-cost means of combating corruption by providing citizens with information about the funding sources and expenditures of groups that advocate for or against issues on the ballot. In practice, however, disclosure does little to inform voters while imposing onerous burdens on those wishing to participate in the democratic debate. […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, campaign finance reform, David Primo, Disclosure, Florida, institute for justice, Disclosure, Disclosure, Florida