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Newsroom

Daily Media Links 9/15: U.S. election agency seeks comment after Facebook cites Russian ads, As G.O.P. Moves to Fill Courts, McConnell Takes Aim at an Enduring Hurdle, and more…

In the News Bloomberg BNA: Conservatives, Reporters, Farmers Back Robber at Supreme Court By Jordan S. Rubin Though the justices are asked to decide whether the Fourth Amendment applies in Carpenter’s case, some of the outside briefs are concerned with another amendment: the First. One of the First Amendment-focused briefs comes from the Reporters Committee […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 9/14: Congress Considers Changes to Trade Association Prior Approval Rules, Senate Panel Likely to Ask Facebook to Publicly Detail Russian Activity on Platform During Election, and more…

CCP CCP Job Opening: Attorney, First Amendment Litigation The Center for Competitive Politics is expanding its litigation team. We are looking for an experienced attorney to take a leading, independent role in First Amendment cases brought in federal and state courts. [Please click on the link above for a detailed description of job responsibilities, requirements, […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 9/13: Trump nominates Texas lawyer Trey Trainor for Federal Election Commission, The Better IRS Reform, and more…

FEC Washington Examiner: Trump to nominate Texas lawyer to FEC By Diana Stancy Correll The White House announced Tuesday evening that President Trump intends to nominate James Trainor III of Texas to be a commissioner of the Federal Election Commission for the remainder of a 6-year term, which would last until April 2021. Once officially […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

National Review: Is Big Ice Cream Trying to Hijack Our Democracy? (In the News)

By Joe Albanese
It may shock you to learn that the multimillionaire co-founder of a global ice-cream empire has been meeting with elected officials in the hopes of fundamentally altering our Constitution. This individual proposes amending the Bill of Rights for the first time to give Congress nearly unlimited power to limit political speech.
That’s right – Big Ice Cream is trying to undermine our democracy. Or at least that’s how it would be put if the wealthy founder of some other, less progressive company tried the same tactics.
In late August, Ben Cohen – the “Ben” in Ben & Jerry’s – appeared at a Philadelphia rally hosted by American Promise, an organization that effectively wants to rewrite the First Amendment…
There is certainly nothing wrong with Cohen’s expressing his views on a political issue. In the past, he has argued that “corporations can serve the needs of society,” in keeping with the increasing demands of the left for progressive corporate activism. The problem is that Cohen’s campaign-finance platform would curtail for others the right that he so proudly exercises – namely, the ability to dedicate resources to causes he cares about. 

Filed Under: In the News, Joe Albanese, Published Articles

NMPolitics.net: New Mexicans should be suspicious of secretary of state’s anti-privacy rulemaking (In the News)

By Bradley Smith and Paul Gessing
Doug Nickle’s recent column (“Campaign reporting proposal creates necessary, nation-leading disclosure in NM”) is an example of Orwellian doublespeak at its best…
Even as Nickle urges support for rules reducing citizen privacy, he avers that the organization he lobbies for, Take Back Our Republic, “believe[s] in the individual’s right to both privacy and free speech” and “[t]hat’s why we support New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver’s proposed rules and regulations.” When the stated purpose of rules is to reduce personal privacy, yet a person tells you he supports them because he believes in privacy, perhaps it is time to be suspicious.
Noting that supporters of privacy have argued that “transparency is for government; privacy is for people,” Nickle also claims, “We couldn’t agree more – which is why we point out that the privacy of any individual or group who gives within the legally prescribed threshold is fully protected; their personal information remains undisclosed.” In other words, your privacy is protected, but only until it crosses a “legally prescribed threshold,” at which point your information will be posted online by government order. 

Filed Under: Brad Smith, In the News, Published Articles

Daily Media Links 9/12: Does Big Philanthropy Threaten Democracy? A Dialogue on The Givers, Denver City Council approves new rules requiring reports of dark-money spending in elections, and more…

In the News NMPolitics.net: New Mexicans should be suspicious of secretary of state’s anti-privacy rulemaking By Bradley Smith and Paul Gessing Doug Nickle’s recent column (“Campaign reporting proposal creates necessary, nation-leading disclosure in NM”) is an example of Orwellian doublespeak at its best… Even as Nickle urges support for rules reducing citizen privacy, he avers […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 9/11: DOJ denies GOP request to reopen case against former IRS official Lois Lerner, Nestled in House Spending Bill: Campaign Finance Deregulation, and more…

The Courts Newseum Institute: State High Courts Can Provide Greater Free-Speech Protections By Lata Nott Forty years ago in the Harvard Law Review,U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan described state constitutions as “a font of individual liberty, their protections often extending beyond those required by the Supreme Court’s interpretation of federal law.”    Brennan urged state high […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 9/8: Feds’ tactics in Johnson-Swallow case are part of what’s ‘destroying the American civil justice system,’ judge says, FEC Might Act on Russia-Linked Facebook Political Ads: Official, and more…

The Courts The Hill: Trump unveils seventh wave of nominees to fill judicial vacancies By Lydia Wheeler President Trump on Thursday announced his seventh wave of judicial nominees as he works to fill more than 100 vacancies on courts across the U.S. Among the batch of 16 nominees, Trump selected his own deputy assistant and […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 9/7: Court order restricting online tabloid images that sharply criticized a recently withdrawn presidential nominee, Russian firm tied to pro-Kremlin propaganda advertised on Facebook during election, and more…

In the News Washington Examiner: How government enables online outrage mobs By Bradley A. Smith Bloomberg columnist Megan McArdle recently noted that “we live in fear of online mobs.”… McArdle argues that the rise of the Internet and online mobs may require us to rethink “the hard, bright line that classical liberalism drew between state […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Portland Mercury: The County Just Instituted Strict Campaign Reforms (In the News)

By Doug Brown
It’s now been more than three weeks since proponents and opponents of a voter-approved set of campaign finance reforms faced off in Multnomah County Circuit Judge Eric Bloch’s courtroom on August 15, and days since the reforms kicked in September 1. Though those new restrictions are supposedly in effect, Bloch has yet to rule on whether the campaign contribution and expense caps violate the state constitution. Multnomah County, officials say, is now in a gray area of campaign finance law…
This summer, an attorney for the Center for Competitive Politics…sought to represent the conservative Taxpayers Association of Oregon in opposition to the measure. They were joined in opposition by the Portland Business Alliance, landlord lobby the Portland Metropolitan Association of Realtors, realtor Alan Mehrwein, and corporate advocacy group Associated Oregon Industry.

Filed Under: In the News, Uncategorized