Newsroom

Newsroom

Bloomberg BNA: Nearly Half of Recent Campaign Money From Undisclosed Sources (In the News)

By Kenneth P. Doyle
Undisclosed donors provided nearly half of the more than $20 million in outside campaign spending in three closely watched, current congressional election races, a Bloomberg BNA review of Federal Election Commission reports found…
In reality, the CCP study said, nonprofits that spend money in campaigns but disclose none of their donors consistently account for less than 5 percent of reported political spending. Regulated political committees and others, like the media, “continue to have the most prominent voices in elections” the CCP said.
Allowing a small role for nonprofits doesn’t “drown out” candidates or undermine disclosure but adds to the diversity of views necessary in a healthy democracy, the CCP said.

Filed Under: In the News, Quotes CCP

New CCP Issue Brief: “Dark Money” Drops to 2.9% of Campaign Spending in 2016

Brief finds that nonprofits have never accounted for more than 5% of all election campaign spending Alexandria, VA – The Center for Competitive Politics, America’s largest nonprofit defending First Amendment political free speech rights, released a new Issue Brief today analyzing the amount of so-called “dark money,” or election campaign spending by nonprofits that are not required […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Issues, Money in Politics, Newsroom, Press Releases, Dark Money, Nonprofit Spending, Political Committee Spending

Greeley Tribune: We should oppose Ken Buck’s rotten proposal to dismantle the FEC (In the News)

By Brad Smith
Buck’s proposal would give the president the power to choose the pivotal fifth vote. In theory, no more than two commissioners could be from the same party, so no party would have a majority. But that would be illusory. For example, a Democratic president could appoint Socialist U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders; Donald Trump could appoint a registered Independent, such as his daughter Ivanka. The president would also name one commissioner to a 10-year term as chairman, meaning the disadvantaged party will spend a full decade on the losing end, even if it managed to win the presidency in between. The result, before long, will be a partisan agency not trusted by roughly half of Americans.

Filed Under: Brad Smith, In the News, Published Articles

Washington Examiner: Is the Supreme Court about to give state and local political parties a boost? (In the News)

By Bradley A. Smith
As part of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance “reform” of 2002, virtually everything these local parties do was brought into the web of federal regulation, and their sources of funding largely cut off. A poorly-reasoned Supreme Court decision, McConnell v. Federal Election Commission, upheld these restrictions against a constitutional challenge in 2003. Cases decided since McConnell, however, have relied on traditional First Amendment reasoning to overturn many parts of that decision. One of the few parts that remains is the restrictions on state and local parties.
The Supreme Court now has a chance to rectify this element of the McConnell decision. Currently before the court is the case of Republican Party of Louisiana v. Federal Election Commission, which challenges those legal restrictions on state and local party activity. The party’s position is simple: Why can super PACs, or a nonprofit like Planned Parenthood Action Fund, accept and spend unlimited sums from any source to influence elections, while political parties cannot? And how can parties corrupt their own candidates by trying to help them win elections?

Filed Under: Brad Smith, In the News, Published Articles

National Press Foundation: Why Limit Campaign Contributions? (In the News)

By Chris Adams
David Keating, president of the Center for Competitive Politics, hears all about efforts to “reform” campaign finance and he asks, Why?
Reviewing the literature on electoral competitiveness, public corruption and the flow of money into campaigns, Keating finds no relationship between money spent and important indicators of robust politics or clean governance. Since adoption of the Federal Election Campaign Act in the 1970s, for example, the number of elections with double-digit shifts in Republican or Democratic seats in Congress has dropped. And over the past 40 years, trust in government has dropped as well.
“I think the impact of these contributions is way overblown,” said Keating.
Keating and his center work to promote and defend First Amendment rights to free political speech, engaging in litigation and training designed to ease restrictions on political donations. In a presentation with NPF Paul Miller fellows, Keating said he would like to get rid of contribution limits to campaigns; substantially raise the financial threshold for something being declared a political action committee; and raise the threshold for what constitutes a small donor who doesn’t have to be disclosed (right now, it’s $200; he would raise that to $1,000).

Filed Under: David Keating, In the News, Quotes CCP

Daily Media Links 5/10: The Trump Executive Order and IRS Politics, Democrats take on Trump over court vacancies, and more…

In the News           Washington Examiner: Is the Supreme Court about to give state and local political parties a boost? By Bradley A. Smith As part of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance “reform” of 2002, virtually everything these local parties do was brought into the web of federal regulation, and their sources of funding largely […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 5/9: President Trump seizes on election rules to push his agenda in new ways, Federal judge blocks parts of Missouri law meant to curb influence of money in politics, and more…

CCP           AEI Panel Explores the Reasons for Congressional Gridlock By Joe Albanese The general thread between speakers was that reforming governing institutions can have unintended consequences. For instance, attempts to make government more transparent and democratic may have actually created greater polarization between the parties. Over time, politicians have relied less and less […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 5/8: Trump to Announce Slate of Conservative Federal Court Nominees, Trump campaign slams media for refusing ad, and more…

The Courts          New York Times: Trump to Announce Slate of Conservative Federal Court Nominees By Adam Liptak Having filled a Supreme Court vacancy, President Trump is turning his attention to the more than 120 openings on the lower federal courts. On Monday, he will announce a slate of 10 nominees to those courts, […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 5/5: Is the American free speech consensus under attack?, California Attorney General Targets Political Nonprofits, and more…

Free Speech      FIRE: ‘So to Speak’ podcast transcript: Former ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser By Nico Perrino Ira Glasser: The notion that by limiting the amount of money you can spend on a right doesn’t restrict the right is absurd. It’s a fantasy. I mean, if I’m at the ACLU and I want […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links

Daily Media Links 5/4: Trump to relax enforcement of political activity by religious groups, White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus on changes to libel law, and more…

Trump Administration     New York Times: Trump Is Expected to Relax Tax Rules on Churches Endorsing Political Candidates By Michael D. Shear, Laurie Goodstein, and Maggie Haberman Mr. Trump’s executive order on political activity, which he will sign while hosting conservative religious leaders, tries to overcome a provision in the federal tax code that […]

Filed Under: Daily Media Links