Legal

Salt Lake Tribune: State agrees to pay legal fees over unconstitutional campaign law (In the News)

Robert Gehrke
The plaintiffs argued that the law was overly broad and, if the law stood, they would be prohibited from weighing in on ballot questions or possible initiatives unless they disclosed all their donors.
The state ultimately capitulated, entering into an agreement last month that the disclosure requirements were unconstitutional unless related to political entities whose “major purpose” is political advocacy.
The state agreed not to prosecute groups for violating the law and to pay the legal fees for the lawyers with the Alexandria, Va.-based Center for Competitive Politics who represented the plaintiffs.

Filed Under: In the News, In the News Our Cases, Utah Taxpayers Association v. Cox

Utah Agrees to Pay $125,000 in Free Speech Lawsuit

State of Utah previously conceded First Amendment violation Alexandria, VA – The state of Utah today told a federal court it would pay $125,000 in attorney’s fees in a constitutional challenge to its campaign finance laws. If the court approves the fees, as expected, it would mark the final step in a lawsuit filed on […]

Filed Under: Blog, Press Releases, Utah Taxpayers Association v. Cox, Utah Taxpayers Association v. Cox, Utah

Amicus Brief: Wolfson v. Concannon in Support of Petitioner

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Filed Under: All Amicus Briefs, Blog, Current Amicus Briefs

Utah settles lawsuit, concedes First Amendment violation

Alexandria, VA – In an agreement approved by a federal judge this afternoon, Utah agreed not to enforce a state campaign finance law that violated the First Amendment. The complex law required nonprofit advocacy groups to register with the state and publicly report their supporters’ private information, threatening donations to those organizations. The agreement, known […]

Filed Under: Blog, Press Releases, Utah Taxpayers Association v. Cox, uta v. cox, Utah

Amicus Brief: Campaign Integrity Watchdog, LLC v. Coloradans for a Better Future (Colorado Court of Appeals)

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Amicus Brief: In re Stephen M. Silberstein

On behalf of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Sen. Thad Cochran, Sen. John Boozman, and Sen. Richard Shelby, CCP filed this friend-of-the-court brief opposing a petition for a Writ of Mandamus filed in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit by Stephen M. Silberstein. Mr. Silberstein sought the writ to force the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to engage in a rulemaking that would mandate corporate disclosure of otherwise-immaterial contributions to political organizations and industry groups. The Senators’ brief noted that such a rulemaking would directly violate the recent omnibus appropriations bill, which should be interpreted as preventing the SEC from regulating in that area. Two days after the filing of this amicus brief, Mr. Silberstein withdrew his petition.

Filed Under: All Amicus Briefs, Blog, Current Amicus Briefs, Featured Content

Amicus Brief: French v. Jones in Support of Plaintiff-Appellant

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Amicus Brief: Holland v. Williams in Opposition to Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss

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Federal Appeals Court Rules Colorado Disclosure Law Unconstitutional

Denver, CO – A federal appeals court unanimously affirmed a lower court decision declaring that Colorado’s ballot issue disclosure law violates the First Amendment for groups raising or spending less than $3,500. The decision was handed down late Wednesday by three judges nominated by President Barack Obama to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Coalition for Secular Government v. Gessler Other Links, CSG v. Gessler, Featured Content, Press Releases, Coalition for Secular Government, Colorado

Victory in SBA List v. Driehaus

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals handed down a wise decision today in striking down Ohio’s false statement law statute in Susan B. Anthony List, et al. v. Driehaus, et al. “Ohio’s laws do not pass constitutional muster because they are not narrowly tailored in their (1) timing, (2) lack of a screening process for […]

Filed Under: Blog, SBA List v. Driehaus, False Statement Laws, Ohio Elections Commission, Ohio