Tax-Financing

2007 Study Report: Has Public Funding Improved Maine Elections?

Since first taking effect in the 2000 election, the Maine Clean Election Act (MCEA) has been in operation for four elections. As a stipulation of the MCEA, a report was required on its status after several elections. What resulted is the following report from the Maine Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices. This study surveys the overall effect of the MCEA by taking into account election data from the 2000-2006 elections, and applying it to the stated goals of the program. Accordingly, the report provides a detailed analysis of the MCEA’s various successes and failures in achieving its goals. A main analytical focus is on spending at all levels, which is calculated and explained through numerous tables and figures. The 2007 report concludes by highlighting the primary issues with the MCEA and offers recommendations to the Maine legislature, which they believe will solve these various problems.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Maine

“Voter-Owned” Elections Pilot Won’t Fly

Press release on North Carolina’s government-financed elections pilot project

Filed Under: External Relations Sub-Pages, Press Releases, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing

Campaign Finance Law Hurts New Yorkers

Today, New York City council considers a proposal to overhaul New York City’s campaign finance laws that will create second class political citizens and greatly expand taxpayer subsidies of campaigns.

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Contribution Limits State, External Relations Press Releases, External Relations Sub-Pages, Press Releases, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing

Government Financed Elections

Overview and CCP Vice President Stephen Hoersting’s Senate Testimony on Government-Financed Elections.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns

Supreme Court Should Decide Grassroots Disclosure Requirements

PRESS RELEASE: April 12, 2007

Media Contact: Mike Schrimpf (703) 682-9359

Filed Under: Other Resources – Corporate Governance, Press Releases, State Comments and Testimony, State Press Releases and Blogs, Tax Financed Campaigns Comments, Tax Financed Campaigns State

Political Welfare: Why Taxpayer-Funded Campaigns Are Bad for Taxpayers and Democracy

In this article, Daren Bakst analyzes the constitutional, financial, and practical issues surrounding North Carolina’s Judicial Campaign Reform Act of 2002, which instituted taxpayer-financed judicial campaigns in the state. Although the article details the constitutional issues inherent in the program’s “rescue funds” provision, which is now unconstitutional as a result of the Supreme Court’s decision in Arizona Free Enterprise Club’s Freedom Club PAC v. Bennett, it also goes in depth to disprove the philosophical and practical arguments of the program’s proponents. Ultimately, Bakst argues that, for a variety of reasons, North Carolina’s taxpayer-funded judicial campaign program should be repealed. Even more significantly, this article is instructive in summarizing many of the problems with judicial tax-financing programs and with tax-financing programs in general.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, North Carolina

Goldwater Institute Study on Arizona’s Taxpayer-financed Elections

A Goldwater Institute published by Allison Hayward about Arizona’s taxpayer financed elections.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona

Do Public Funding Programs Enhance Electoral Competition?

For the first part of this study, the authors examine Maine and Arizona, the states that have already enacted “clean election” laws, or taxpayer financed campaigns.  They ask the questions: “Does public financing work?” and “Does it achieve the goals that are put forth as justification?”   The authors also analyze the four arguments advocates of public financing often rely on.  The authors first explain why public funding would work, in theory; followed by why it does not fully work.  They do this by addressing the congressional reports, campaign finance legislation and data on electoral competition.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, f, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Arizona, Maine

Does Cleanliness Lead to Competitiveness? The Failure of Maine’s Experiment with Taxpayer Financing of Campaigns

On November 5, 1996, voters passed the Maine Clean Election Act by ballot initiative. That was the first piece of state or federal legislation to offer taxpayer financing to state-level candidates who voluntarily accept spending limits and refuse private contributions. The legislation applied to state senate and house candidates beginning with the 2000 primary and […]

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Cato Institute, Maine Clean Election Act, Martin Zelder, Patrick Basham, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Maine

Government Financing of Campaigns: Public Choice and Public Values

In this policy briefing, John Samples argues against the notions that taxpayer financed campaigns would increase the integrity of elections and lawmaking, political equality, and electoral competitiveness. One of the popular arguments in support of government financed campaigns is that they will reduce the incidence of corruption. Samples opines that taxpayer financed campaigns are themselves corrupt, as public funds are used to serve private interests. He also rebukes the argument that the public favors the rhetorically-challenged message of “clean elections” and “reform.” Ultimately, Samples’ analysis demonstrates why the efforts of the “reformers” are likely to fail.

Filed Under: Research, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns, Faulty Assumptions, Faulty Assumptions, Taxpayer Financed Campaigns