External Relations Sub-Pages

Court Strikes Down Attempt to Allow Taxpayer-Funded Campaigns

Alexandria, VA –  A Sacramento County Superior Court judge struck down a law passed late last year to allow state and some local governments to enact taxpayer financing of political campaigns.  The Court ruled the Legislature’s attempt to bypass a vote of the people on such legislation violated the California Constitution and the 1974 Political […]

Filed Under: Blog, hjta v Brown, Newsroom, Press Releases, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax-Financing, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, Political Reform Act of 1974, Proposition 73, Quentin Kopp, California

Constitutional and Practical Issues with New Mexico Secretary of State Revised Proposed Rule 1.10.13 NMAC

VIA ELECTRONIC MAIL Hon. Maggie Toulouse Oliver, New Mexico Secretary of State Capitol Annex North 325 Don Gaspar Suite 300 Santa Fe, N.M. 87501 RE: Constitutional and Practical Issues with Revised Proposed Rule 1.10.13 NMAC Dear Secretary Toulouse Oliver: On behalf of the Center for Competitive Politics (“the Center”),[1] I respectfully submit these comments concerning […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Disclosure, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, Issues, State, State Comments and Testimony, coordination, Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver, New Mexico

What’s the Value of “Outside Speech” Anyway?

Far outside the boundaries of the continental United States, Alaska’s stringent campaign finance regulations go a step further in distinguishing The Last Frontier from its counterparts. One such regulation that is particularly contentious is an aggregate limit on contributions from non-residents to Alaska candidates, groups, and political parties. Say there is an individual, Betty, who […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Contribution Limits State, Issues, McCutcheon v. FEC, Money in Politics, State, State Press Releases and Blogs, aggregate limits, Bluman v. FEC, First-Come First-Served Limits, Out-of-State Donors, Thompson v. Hebdon, Alaska

Issue One Interview Unwittingly Undermines Narrative of Campaign Finance Corruption

Last week, Issue One – a group that advocates for greater regulation of political speech – published an interview with former Congressman Mike Castle. Castle was a Republican representative from Delaware from 1993 to 2011, and governor of the state from 1985 to 1992. He’s also a member of Issue One’s “ReFormers Caucus,” a group […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits Federal, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, Super PACs, corruption, Fundraising, Issue One, Mike Castle

Can Nonprofits Be Successful without Donor Privacy?

Last week, Nonprofit Quarterly (NPQ), a website and magazine that writes about nonprofit management and governance, published an article about “liberating” 501(c)(4) advocacy nonprofits from the “‘dark money’ trap.” It was a response to another recent piece in the American Prospect by Nan Aron and Abby Levine of the progressive Alliance for Justice offering a […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, 501(c)(4)'s, Alliance for Justice, Donor Privacy, Nonprofit Advocacy, Nonprofit Quarterly, NPQ, Privacy

Are Tax-Financed Campaigns Worth the Price?

A recently published study examines taxpayer-financed campaign systems in different locales; specifically, programs that provide matching public funds to municipal candidates in New York City and Los Angeles. The study’s authors are Michael J. Malbin of the Campaign Finance Institute and University at Albany, SUNY, and Michael Parrott of Columbia University. Although the authors acknowledge […]

Filed Under: Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns Research, Tax-Financing, Los Angeles, Michael J. Malbin, Michael Parrott, New York City, Small Donors, California, New York

When Gridlock is Good

In recent months, a handful of members on both sides of the aisle in the House of Representatives have proposed legislation to change the structure of the Federal Election Commission (FEC) under the guise of reform. On August 1, Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly announced companion legislation in the Senate that would revamp the FEC, which […]

Filed Under: Blog, Federal, Federal Press Releases and Blogs, Enforcement, FEC, federal election commission, Joe Donnelly

In Trump’s America, Common Cause Cares about the First Amendment

Common Cause, a group that actively pushes for broader campaign finance disclosure laws, recently sued President Trump’s Election Integrity Commission in federal court in an attempt to block the Commission’s efforts to obtain voter data from the states. The legal complaint notes that the Commission issued “a sweeping request for [Americans’] voting and other personal […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, Common Cause, Donald Trump, Harassment, Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, Privacy, Trump

Giving Taxpayer Dollars to Local D.C. Politicians is a Bad Idea

Last week, D.C. Councilmember and Chair Pro Tempore Kenyan McDuffie took to the pages of The Washington Post to advocate for taxpayer funding for local political campaigns. Under this system, candidates for Council (and a handful of additional races) who agree to only accept small-dollar contributions and completely forgo donations from PACs would receive $5 […]

Filed Under: Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns Press Release/In the News/Blog, Tax Financed Campaigns State, Tax-Financing, corruption, Kenyan McDuffie, Los Angeles, New York City, Seattle, Washington DC, Arizona, California, Maine, New York, Washington

Did Dean Heller Really “Change” His Vote on Health Care Because of Donor Pressure?

When it comes to the complexity of American politics, the multi-month effort by congressional Republicans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (also known as the ACA and, of course, Obamacare) has been instructive. Party leaders, advocacy groups, health industry stakeholders, government agencies, and the media all weighed in during the divisive process. This […]

Filed Under: Blog, Issues, Money in Politics, ACA, Affordable Care Act, Dean Heller, Donors, Obamacare