Blog

Whether disclosure is forced or banned, regulating politics is a dangerous path

In the Washington Post, political science professors Bertram J. Levine and Michael Johnston offer a somewhat unusual proposal for reforming campaign finance disclosure laws: make all contributions anonymous. This proposal first gained widespread attention with a book by Ian Ayres and Bruce Ackerman in 2002, “Voting With Dollars: A New Paradigm for Campaign Finance.” The [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Uncategorized

Independence Institute Sues Colorado

For more information on the case, check out our backgrounder and resource page!

Filed Under: Blog, Independence Institute v. Gessler Other Links

Independent Spending and Independent Voters

Arizona Republic columnist Laurie Roberts is conflicted about trends in the state’s August 26 primary. On the one hand, she is dismayed that “Already, more than $5 million in dark money has been spent trying to influence your vote by … well, we don’t really know who it is who so badly wanted you to [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Arizona

Lawsuit challenges McCain-Feingold disclosure law

The Center for Competitive Politics today filed two lawsuits on behalf of a Colorado think tank saying that similar state and federal campaign finance disclosure laws are unconstitutional under the First Amendment. The Independence Institute wishes to run two ads: one asking Colorado Senators Mark Udall and Michael Bennett to support a federal sentencing reform [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Independence Institute v. FEC Other Links, Independence Institute v. Gessler Other Links, Press Releases

The value of an endorsement

Former Iowa State Senator Kent Sorenson has pled guilty to falsifying campaign finance reports. Apparently, in 2008, an operative of Ron Paul’s presidential campaign, Dmitri Kasari, offered Sorenson $8,000 a month to switch his support from Michelle Bachmann to Rep. Paul. The payments were reported through other vendors. Sorenson was eventually paid at least $73,000. [...]

Filed Under: Blog, campaign finance reform, Dmitri Kasari, Kent Sorenson, Michelle Bachmann

15 Things Vox Forgot to Mention about “Money in Politics” (Part II)

Vox.com’s “40 charts that explain money in politics” fails miserably at, well, explaining money in politics. The charts seem to be less an explanation and more unproven innuendo about why money is supposedly ruining American democracy. What the collection of charts does do, however, is provide a window into some of the common misconceptions about [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics, corruption, Disclosure, Good Governance, Vox

15 Things Vox Forgot to Mention about “Money in Politics” (Part I)

Vox.com’s “40 charts that explain money in politics” fails miserably at, well, explaining money in politics. The charts seem to be less an explanation and more unproven innuendo about why money is supposedly ruining American democracy. What the collection of charts does do, however, is provide a window into some of the common misconceptions about [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics

Calling Campaign Legal Center: Incorruptible Oregon refuses to get with the program

A couple weeks ago, the Campaign Legal Center’s lobbyist, Meredith McGehee, took the pages of The Hill to excoriate Virginia for not passing more campaign finance restrictions. Because Virginia has “few restrictions on money in campaigns,” the ethics and bribery trial of former Governor Bob McDonnell, she assured her readers, was pretty much a foregone conclusion. [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits, Campaign Legal Center, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, City University Hong Kong, Contribution limits, corruption, Indiana University, Meredith McGehee, Oregon, Blog (Contribution Limits), Oregon, Utah

Media Watch: WaPo Turning a New Leaf on Disclosure?

In the debate over campaign finance disclosure laws, it’s no mystery what side The Washington Post is on. Editorials like these consistently advocate expanding burdensome disclosure requirements to even more groups and even more forms of spending than what the law already extensively requires. In the Post’s view, the need for more compulsory disclosure is [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog, Media Watch

Public Campaign’s Obfuscation about Tax-Financed Polarization

Proponents of tax-financed campaigns, sometimes euphemistically referred to as “clean elections” or “fair elections,” have spent years arguing that these programs will lead to policy outcomes that better reflect the views of the average voter (as subjective as that determination may be). But as Arizona trends towards more conservative politics under the state’s Citizens Clean [...]

Filed Under: Blog, Arizona