Blog

No, Commissioner Weintraub, the FEC Can’t Circumvent Citizens United

In an opinion piece published yesterday in The New York Times, Ellen Weintraub, a member of the Federal Election Commission, suggests a way to “blunt the impact” of Citizens United v. FEC. There are reasons to question the propriety of a federal officer attempting to “blunt” a First Amendment ruling against her agency, and I […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, ellen weintraub, FEC

Significant Constitutional and Practical Issues with Rhode Island Senate Bill 2369, to amend Section 17-25-7 of the General Laws

The Honorable Michael J. McCaffrey The Honorable Paul V. Jabour Re:  Significant Constitutional and Practical Issues with Senate Bill 2369, to amend Section 17-25-7 of the General Laws Dear Chairperson McCaffrey, Vice Chairperson Jabour, and members of the Senate Judiciary Committee: On behalf of the Center for Competitive Politics,[1] I respectfully submit the following comments […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, State Comments and Testimony, Financial Town Meetings, Rhode Island

Citizens United is Too Often Distorted in the Press

Newsweek recently published, “How Dark Money Boomeranged on the GOP,” by Kurt Eichenwald. The article, about Citizens United v. FEC’s purported effect on the Republican Party blatantly distorts nearly every aspect of the free-speech case. Mr. Eichenwald’s second paragraph begins: “[T]he infamous Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission [decision], which declared that associations of people […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Media Watch, Super PACs, Kurt Eichenwald, Newsweek

Super PACs Aren’t So Super Compared to the Media

Putting a dollar value on “free” or “earned” media can help put in perspective the supposedly tsunami-like sums of money spent by candidates and independent super PACs on the campaign trail. The New York Times recently did just that, and found that the value of media coverage exceeds candidate and super PAC spending on paid […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Money in Politics, Super PACs, A. Barton Hinkle, Donald Trump, Les Moonves, The Media

Georgia H.B. 370; Analysis of Proposed Amendment to Regulate So-Called “Election Targeted Issue Advocacy”

The Honorable David Ralston The Honorable David Shafer Re:  H.B. 370; Analysis of Proposed Amendment to Regulate So-Called “Election Targeted Issue Advocacy” Dear Speaker Ralston and President Pro Tempore Shafer: The Center for Competitive Politics (CCP)[1] respectfully submits the following comments analyzing a proposed amendment to regulate “election targeted issue advocacy,” which we understand some […]

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure Comments, Disclosure State, External Relations Comments and Testimony, State Comments and Testimony, Election Targeted Issue Advocacy, Eric Wang, Georgia

Seven Myths about Disclosure Masquerading as “Realities”

This Issue Brief by Center for Competitive Politics Senior Fellow Eric Wang[1] analyzes seven alleged “myths” about campaign finance disclosure as discussed by the pro-regulation Campaign Legal Center. The Campaign Legal Center (CLC) recently issued a briefing paper worthy of Lewis Carroll.[2] Purporting to explain “Seven Myths (and Realities) about Disclosure,”[3] the CLC paper instead […]

Filed Under: Blog, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Corporate Governance, Corporate Governance Handouts, Disclosure, Disclosure Handouts, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Super PACs, Super PACs, Campaign Legal Center, Electioneering Communications, federal election commission, NAACP v. Alabama, Securities and Exchange Commission, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Disclosure, Jurisprudence & Litigation

Are state parties a solution to political “chaos”?

“It’s chaos out there.” That’s how Jonathan Rauch, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, describes the state of politics today. Rauch and Raymond J. La Raja, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a CCP Academic Advisor, believe that freeing state parties to play a more active […]

Filed Under: Blog, Contribution Limits Press Release/In the News/Blog, Money in Politics, Super PACs, Brookings Institution, Jason Perkey, John Phillippe, Jonathan Rauch, Political Parties, Raymond J. La Raja

PR Firms Sue NY on New Lobbying Rule

Alexandria, VA – The Center for Competitive Politics (CCP), America’s largest nonprofit working to promote and defend First Amendment rights to free political speech, assembly, and petition announced that five public relations firms filed a lawsuit in federal court today seeking to block a new lobbying rule by the New York State Joint Commission on […]

Filed Under: Blog, Featured Content, November Team v. JCOPE, Press Releases, November Team v. JCOPE

Federal Appeals Court Rules Colorado Disclosure Law Unconstitutional

Denver, CO – A federal appeals court unanimously affirmed a lower court decision declaring that Colorado’s ballot issue disclosure law violates the First Amendment for groups raising or spending less than $3,500. The decision was handed down late Wednesday by three judges nominated by President Barack Obama to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Coalition for Secular Government v. Gessler Other Links, CSG v. Gessler, Featured Content, Press Releases, Coalition for Secular Government, Colorado

“Reformers” Can’t Decide Which Election Money Is Buying

The rise of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders and the flops of the Jeb Bush, Scott Walker, and Rick Perry campaigns illustrate, yet again, how weak the influence of money can be on election results. This is a problem for those who argue that plutocracy has overtaken democracy or that money in politics is the […]

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics, 2016 Campaign, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, Jeb Bush, Rick Hasen, Rick Perry, Scott Walker, The New York Times