Full Disclosure: How Campaign Finance Disclosure Laws Fail to Inform Voters and Stifle Public Debate

Disclosure is intended to be a low-cost means of combating corruption by providing citizens with information about the funding sources and expenditures of groups that advocate for or against issues on the ballot. In practice, however, disclosure does little to inform voters while imposing onerous burdens on those wishing to participate in the democratic debate. […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, campaign finance reform, David Primo, Disclosure, Florida, institute for justice, Disclosure, Disclosure, Florida

So What if Corporations Aren’t People?

Much criticism of the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United stems from the claim that the Constitution does not protect corporations because they are not “real” people. While it’s true that corporations aren’t human beings, that truism is constitutionally irrelevant because corporations are formed by individuals as a means of exercising their constitutionally protected rights. […]

Filed Under: First Amendment, Research, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, corporate speech, corporations, First Amendment, First Amendment, First Amendment

The Constitutional Right That Big Corporations Should Have But Do Not Want

In an age of much sharp political division and incipient populism, it is easy to raise emotional flags by asking the question of whether corporations should have some of the same rights as individuals. In this article, Richard A. Epstein examines the many questions that swirl around the Citizens United decision in order to expose […]

Filed Under: External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, corporate speech, corporations, First Amendment, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation, First Amendment, Jurisprudence & Litigation

After Citizens United

In this law review article, Michael S. Kang analyzes the trends in the Supreme Court’s rulings on campaign finance cases in light of the landmark decision in Citizens United v. FEC. Kang argues that Justice Anthony Kennedy’s views are driving the direction of the Roberts Court towards a narrower justification for government regulation of campaign […]

Filed Under: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, External Relations Sub-Pages, First Amendment, Independent Speech, Issues, Research, Super PACs, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, First Amendment, super PACs, Supreme Court, First Amendment, Independent Speech, First Amendment, Independent Speech

Mandatory Disclosure for Ballot-Initiative Campaigns

The most common approach to disclosure in American politics is simply and aptly described as “more is better.” Disclosure is often championed as a low-cost means of combating the allegedly corrosive effects of money in politics by providing information to the public about the source of funding and expenditures made by groups advocating for the […]

Filed Under: Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure State, External Relations Sub-Pages, Research, ballot initiatives, campaign finance reform, Dick Carpenter, Disclosure, institute for justice, polling, Disclosure, Disclosure, California, Colorado, Florida, Massachusetts, Ohio, Washington

Fooling the Court

In this article, Capital University Law Professor and Center for Competitive Politics Chairman and Co-Founder Brad Smith addresses two 2006 Supreme Court cases relating to campaign finance. Specifically, he argues that the Court is often fundamentally misled about the nature of money in politics. Smith analyzes the factual components of recent cases League of United […]

Filed Under: Contribution Limits, Contribution Limits, Contributions & Limits, External Relations Sub-Pages, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Research, Contribution Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Contributions & Limits, Jurisprudence & Litigation, Vermont

A Simple Explanation for Why Campaign Expenditures are Increasing: the Government is Getting Bigger

In this paper, John R. Lott, Jr. explains that most of the recent increases in campaign spending for federal and state offices can be explained by higher government spending. This result holds for both federal and state legislative campaigns and for gubernatorial races as well as across many different specifications. The author also examines whether […]

Filed Under: Expenditure, External Relations Sub-Pages, Issues, Money in Politics, Research, money in politics, Expenditure, Expenditure