Montana, America’s most corrupt state

Is Montana the nation’s most corrupt state? Are its voters less able to weed out corrupt candidates? The Montana Supreme Court seems to think so.

Filed Under: Blog, Completed Case, Litigation Blog/Press Releases, Western Tradition Partnership v. Bullock Other Links, Montana

CCP amicus brief cited in Western Tradition Partnership dissent

CCP’s amicus brief in Western Tradition Partnership v. Attorney General was cited in the first of the two filed dissenting opinions.

Filed Under: Blog, Completed Case, Litigation Blog/Press Releases, Western Tradition Partnership v. Bullock Other Links, amicus brief, Montana

Larry Ribstein passes

We at the Center were, like many, many others with connections to the legal academy, saddened to learn of the death of University of Illinois law professor Larry Ribstein on December 23. There is little we can add to the various condolences and remembrances by people who knew him better, many of which are collected here and here.

Professor Ribstein was a corporate legal scholar, not a campaign finance or election scholar, but his work is very important in understanding corporate rights to free speech, a subject much in the news since Citizens United v. FEC was decided nearly two years ago.

Filed Under: Blog

It’s a Wonder World of Campaign Finance Regulation

So, it’s Christmas weekend, and perhaps you need a change of pace from It’s a Wonderful Life and George C. Scott in a Christmas Carol. If so, have we got a treat for you.

This is a panel on the proper role of disclosure in campaign finance, from the Federalist Society National Lawyers Conference in 2010. It features CCP Founder and Chairman Bradley Smith and several more distinguished speakers.

Filed Under: Blog

Amicus Brief in DeLay v. State

Arguing that laws criminalizing First Amendment conduct must at least be clear, the Center for Competitive Politics filed an amicus brief in the Texas Court of Appeals in DeLay v. State.  

For nearly a decade, Tom DeLay and his colleagues have been involved in a legal challenge concerning the constitutionality of the Texas Election Code.  The case centers on a complaint filed by Texans for Public Justice alleging that even though DeLay and his associates complied with relevant provisions of Texas election law, their use of election funds was somehow illegal. 

 

 

Filed Under: Completed Amicus Briefs, Legal, Legal Center, amicus brief, delay, Amicus Briefs, Completed Cases (Amicus), Texas

One Editor’s Response to A Win for Free Speech

The Center often receives interesting responses when we send out press materials regarding our research.  Today’s release was no exception. 

We received a response to this release from the Wayne County Mail saying:

SO were these “JUSTICES” making these decisions right wingers?

What about the right of people to be safe in their homes from their right wing gun nuts making these stupid phone calls.

You are not campaigning for freedom. You are a right wing front group trying to destroy the rights of All Americans for the few idiots.

Please remove us from your mailing list. 

 

Filed Under: Blog

Center for Competitive Politics Releases Public Perception & the “Appearance of Corruption” in Campaign Finance Report

 

Contact: Sarah Lee, Communications Director

The Center for Competitive Politics

770.598.7961

ALEXANDRIA, Va. - The American people believe political contributions should be disclosed, but don’t actually use the information themselves; they dislike seeing tax dollars used to fund campaigns; and they think that the current $2,500 federal limit on individual campaign contributions could be quadrupled without increasing government corruption.  

These were among the findings of a poll of over 55,000 Americans surveyed as part of the 2010 Cooperative Congressional Election Study, and reviewed in Public Perception & the “Appearance of Corruption” in Campaign Finance, released today by the Center for Competitive Politics.

 

Filed Under: Disclosure, External Relations Press Releases, External Relations Sub-Pages, Press Releases

It’s Time To Bring Some Sanity To Campaign Finance Laws

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Filed Under: In the News

Legal Director Allen Dickerson on Last Week’s Advisory Opinions

CCP Legal Director Allen Dickerson wrote a column Wednesday commenting on the FEC’s response last week to the Sen. Mike Lee and American Crossroads advisory opinions:

Lee’s camp argued that IEs don’t give funds directly to candidates’ campaigns so they can’t be corrupting. Why should it matter, the Lee camp’s thinking goes, if the funds went to a leadership PAC? They still couldn’t be used for any of Lee’s election activity, and so they couldn’t corrupt him or anyone else.

The FEC disagreed-in a unanimous vote. And because a federal statute was directly on point, capping contributions not only to federal candidates but also their agents and any affiliated entities, the commission had little choice. That doesn’t mean the underlying law is constitutional-and I expect we’ll see litigation on precisely that point-but at least the FEC recognized that, where there’s controlling law, its duty is to explain that law to the public.

 

Filed Under: Blog

Colbert Shining a Light on Himself

Politico has a piece in today’s edition mentioning the “love” that comedian Stephen Colbert has been getting from the Federal Election Commission (FEC) for shining a little light on this obscure corner of the federal government.”

Stephen Colbert got some love from the Federal Election Commission Thursday for bringing public attention to a wonky campaign finance issue.

By asking his supporters to weigh in on a request from the Karl Rove-backed super PAC American Crossroads to “fully coordinate” political ads with candidates without violating laws that prohibit coordination, the comedian helped generate more buzz around the issue than the FEC is used to seeing.



 

Filed Under: Blog, Money in Politics, Super PACs