This weekend in campaign finance

With the second anniversary of the Citizens United decision coming up this Saturday, reform groups are  pulling out all the stops to protest the decision.  Between  coming up with impossibly forced acronyms and enacting whatever solution they came up with during their anti-CU house parties, the reform community should probably prepare for another Supreme Court case.

However, the usual suspects aren’t the only ones decrying super PAC influence and the end to civility in politics.  As Romney’s manifest destiny as the Republican nominee plays out in the primaries, his lead is large enough that even he is jumping on the anti-super PAC bandwagon.  After his magnificent fall in the polls, Gingrich has as well; Gingrich and Romney find further common ground  here.

And where  there’s a serious point to be made, there’s Stephen Colbert.

Finally, in the “quaking in our boots” department, Occupy DC’s general assembly passed a corporate personhood resolution calling on Congress to “enact” a Constitutional amendment crushing the collective rights of those of us who don’t voluntarily live on a street and work as part of an association of individuals.  They should probably heed this warning (The Atlantic):

In brief, reformers seem oblivious to the dangers of initiating a re-write of the First Amendment, which they will not be able to control; they blind themselves to the fact that money enables speech, as it enables and is inextricably bound to the exercise of other rights; and (putting aside debates about the speech rights of business corporations) their proposed amendments tend to dismiss or elide the difficulties of eliminating corporate speech rights and retaining the rights of non-profit citizen advocacy groups and the for-profit (or aspirationally for-profit) press.

Have a great week!