Schumer, Specter Resolution to Dismantle the First Amendment Introduced

Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Arlen Specter (R-PA) introduced a resolution today (S.J. Res. 21) that would dismantle the First Amendment.

Filed Under: Blog

Huckabee: “Nothing prohibited, everything disclosed”

The Associated Press reports that presidential hopeful Mike Huckabee told a Rotary Club in New Hampshire that he would like to "see a ‘nothing prohibited, everything disclosed’ system where candidates could accept unlimited money from all sources but would have publicly disclose each penny within 24 hours."

The AP also reports that Huckabee "said the campaign finance law co-authored by one of his rivals — Arizona Sen. John McCain — has deformed rather than reformed the system and is moving the nation toward a plutocracy.

‘We will end up with a ruling class and servant class and we will ruin the middle class,’ he said. ‘We will make it so politics will become the domain of the extraordinarily wealthy.’"

Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog

Discharge petition launched to statutorily prohibit a return of the Fairness Doctrine

House members today moved forward on a discharge petition that would force a vote on the Broadcast Freedom Act.  The act would statutorily prohibit a return of the "Fairness Doctrine."

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Filed Under: Blog

Giuliani Recants Support of McCain-Feingold

The New York Sun reports that Rudy Giuliani recanted his support of the speech-suppressing McCain-Feingold campaign finance law.

From the Sun: "’It’s one of the many occasions on which I could point out to you I’m not perfect,’ Mr. Giuliani told members of the conservative Club for Growth this morning, referring to his backing of the 2002 bill that placed restrictions on campaign spending."

After the speech, Giuliani again repeated that supporting McCain-Feingold was "a big mistake."

Filed Under: Blog

Using taxpayer money to underwrite lagging campaigns

The Washington Post reports on the likelihood of financially struggling presidential campaigns going to the taxpayers for a handout.

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Filed Under: Blog

FEC appeals Shays III

The Federal Election Commission anounced today that it is filing an appeal in Shays v. FEC (Shays III).

Click the headline for CCP’s statement.

Filed Under: Blog

Democratic Congressman leads fight to end contribution limits in Philly

Representative Chaka Fattah (D-PA) is leading the fight against contribution limits in Philadelphia.

The restrictions, enacted in 2003, limit individual political contributions to $2,500 per candidate and cut political committee donations to candidates to $10,000. This Spring, Fattah ran in the first ever mayoral primary in Philadelphia with the limits.  He finished fourth out of five candidates seeking the Democratic nomination.

Now, Fattah is trying to overturn the city law enabling contribution limits.

Click the headline for more.

Filed Under: Blog

Schumer, Specter scheduled to Introduce Anti-First Amendment Bill

Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY) and Arlen Specter (R-PA) were scheduled to introduce a bill today that would dismantle the First Amendment.

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Filed Under: Blog

Pig at the trough

The New York media went after New York City Councilman Larry Seabrook for wasting taxpayer money earmarked for his council campaign on personal use.

An editorial in the New York Daily News begins "Hey, boys and girls! Want a new computer? Robocaller? Custom-made office chair? Run for election. With no real opponent. Your role model can be Bronx Councilman Larry Seabrook, who has managed to soak the taxpayers thanks to New York City’s overly generous public campaign finance system."

The New York Post editorial starts, "If you build it, they will come and get it.  That is, free money attracts freeloaders – such as, for example, City Councilman Larry Seabrook (D-Bronx)."

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Filed Under: Blog

Tom Coburn’s perplexing statement

Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) recently said that more campaign finance disclosure is needed to form a more ethical Congress.

The McAlester News-Capital reports that Coburn believes "If legislators were required to disclose all contributions to their campaigns, the public knowledge would naturally restrain legislators from acting out of the current quid pro quo mindset… They would refrain from taking questionable donations for fear of being found out."

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Filed Under: Blog, Disclosure, Disclosure Press Release/In the News/Blog